Bear Lake Memorial Hospital named Top 20 Critical Access Hospital

Bear Lake Memorial Hospital in Montpelier, ID was recently recognized with two national awards:  (1) Top 20 Critical Access Hospital (CAH), and (2) Top 20 “Best Practices in Quality”. There are over 1300 critical access hospitals in the nation and BLMH ranked in the 99.6% percentile overall.  The Top 20 Critical Access Hospitals scored best among critical access hospitals, as determined by The Chartis Center for Rural Health, and was recently announced by the National Rural Health Association (NRHA).

The Top 20 Critical Access Hospital “winners” are those hospitals who have achieved success in overall performance based on a composite rating from seven indices of strength: Patient Satisfaction, Operational Costs, Financial Stability, Patient Expense, Market Share, Outcomes, and Quality. The Top 20 Critical Access Hospitals are recognized for the outstanding patient satisfaction they provide.

 

The Top 20 Best Practices in Quality award is a rating of hospital performance based on the percentile rank across the five categories of ‘Hospital Compare Process of Care’ measures. All hospitals in the index study are evaluated across rural-relevant Process of Care measures (including Heart Failure, Pneumonia, and Outpatient metrics). The Best Practices in Quality award recipients are recognized for the outstanding quality they deliver to their patients.

 

“Bear Lake Memorial Hospital is proud of the efforts of its physicians and staff who have contributed to our hospital achieving this designation,” said Dennis Carlson, Hospital Administrator. “Our results as top 99.6% percentile overall means our visitors and community members can count on us to deliver the services they need now and in the future.”

 

Bear Lake Memorial Hospital invites the public to come to a Top 20 Community Celebration on Friday, June 29th at Well C. Stock Park in Montpelier. It will be held from 5pm – 8pm and have food, games, giveaways, along with Top 20 hit songs from 50s, 60s, 70s, and 80s. More information can be found at www.BLMHospital.com.

 

About the National Rural Health Association

NRHA is a nonprofit organization working to improve the health and wellbeing of rural Americans and providing leadership on rural health issues through advocacy, communications, education, and research. NRHA membership is made up of 21,000 diverse individuals and organizations, all of whom share the common bond of an interest in rural health. For more information, visit RuralHealthWeb.org.

 

About the Chartis Group

The Chartis Group (Chartis) provides comprehensive advisory services and analytics to the health care industry. With an unparalleled depth of expertise in strategic planning, performance excellence, informatics and technology, and health analytics, Chartis helps leading academic medical centers, integrated delivery networks, children’s hospitals and health care service organizations achieve transformative results. Learn more at Chartisrural.com

National Cancer Survivor’s Month

Image result for cancer survivor June 2018National cancer survivor’s month was established to recognize those who have successfully fought or are in the process of fighting the disease.  Each one of us most likely knows a person who has either succumbed to cancer or is currently battling the disease.  Cancer is a disease that literally affects millions of Americans daily.  In June we take time to celebrate those who are still among us after having fought cancer.

Thanks to many advancements in treating cancer, people are living longer after receiving a cancer diagnosis.  The most recent studies show that more than six million men, and seven million women have managed to survive cancer in the United States.  The growing number of cancer survivors is not an indication that cancer rates are rising, (they have actually declined over the past 10 years), but more an indication that treatments are improving.

In 2014, half of the cancer survivors were diagnosed before the age of 66 and half were diagnosed after.  Certain types of cancer affect a particular age group more commonly than others.  For instance, the median age of someone with lymphocytic leukemia is 14, but for those with bladder cancer, it’s 73.

Today, 64% of all cancer survivors have lived at least five years since their diagnosis.  A great many of these have gone on to live long lives, with 46% of them reaching their 70th birthday.

For men, the largest group of survivors is the 43% who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.  Colorectal cancer has the second largest group of survivors among men.

Among women, survivors of breast cancer are by far the largest group, making up 41% of female cancer survivors.  Uterine and colorectal cancer both have the second largest group of female survivors.  This makes sense when we understand that women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than either uterine or colorectal cancer.

Some types of cancers are as common in men as they are in women.  For instance, survivors of colorectal cancers account for 9% of male cancer survivors and 8% of female cancer survivors. The survival rate for Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is essentially the same for men as it is for women.

Early detection is key to survival.  The growing number of survivors in the U.S. helps us understand the importance of health screenings such as blood work, colonoscopies, and mammograms.  Please talk with your doctor to take advantage of these screenings.

National Stroke & High Blood Pressure Awareness Month

Stroke is the number five cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States.  A stroke affects the arteries leading to and within the brain.

Did you know…

Someone has a stroke every 40 seconds in the U.S.

            -Each year, about as many Americans have a stroke as a heart attack.

-Stroke causes more than 133,000 deaths annually

Stroke is largely treatable and most strokes are preventable

            –The faster you are treated, the more likely you are to recover

-Stroke patients who receive the clot-busting drug alteplase (IV r-tPA) within 90 minutes of symptom onset are almost 3 times more likely to recover with little or no disability.

-91 % of stroke patients who were treated with a stent retriever within 2.5 hours of symptom onset recovered with little or no disability.

High blood pressure (hypertension) is the most important controllable risk factor for stroke.

            -One in three American adults has high blood pressure

About three in four people who have a first stroke, have blood pressure greater than    140/90 mm Hg.  Normal blood pressure is 120/90 mm Hg.

-The American Heart Association says high blood pressure is usually preventable with simple steps*, yet it kills more people worldwide than any other condition.

World Hypertension Day is May 17th, and the American heart Association wants people to check their blood pressure by May 17, 2018.

*Steps to reduce high blood pressure

-Reduce sodium in your diet                         -Quit smoking

-Lost extra pounds                                         -Cut back on Caffeine

-Eat a healthy diet                                         -Reduce Stress

-Limit alcohol intake                                      -Exercise regularly

Top 100 in the Nation Two Years in a Row

Bear Lake Memorial Hospital in Montpelier, ID was recently named one of the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals in the United States by iVantage Health Analytics and The Chartis Center for Rural Health. This is the second year in a row the hospital has gotten this recognition. BLMH is one of only three hospitals in Idaho that have received this ranking.

Bear Lake Memorial scored in the top 100 of Critical Access Hospitals on iVantage Health Analytics’ Hospital Strength INDEX®. The INDEX is the industry’s most comprehensive rating of rural providers. Each hospital is measured across eight pillars of strength: Inpatient Share Ranking, Outpatient Share Ranking, Cost, Charge, Quality, Outcomes, Patient Perspectives, and Financial Stability.

“It’s more important than ever that rural hospitals proactively understand and address performance in the areas of cost, quality, outcomes and patient perspective. iVantage’s INDEX was designed to serve as this industry model,” said Michael Topchik, national leader of the Chartis Center for Rural Health.

Recognitions like these reinforce the high standard of quality healthcare the hospital provides and will continue to provide to the citizens of the Bear Lake Valley. Hospital Administrator, Dennis Carlson states, “This achievement is very gratifying and validates our daily commitment to providing the best health care possible to our community while maintaining an efficient and effective facility.”

 

See data directly from Beckers Hospital Review at https://goo.gl/D28TN4

 

Fall Prevention

Falls are a common danger facing people as they age, and for seniors, a fall can be really bad news.  A new study shows the importance of avoiding that first fall. The findings, published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, showed that more than half the seniors who went to the emergency room because of a fall either had additional falls, had to be hospitalized, or died within 6 months.

According to the National Council on Aging, every 11 seconds an older adult is seen in an emergency department for a fall-related injury.  However, by becoming educated and taking a few precautions, many falls are preventable. The National Council on Aging gives 6 basic tips for preventing falls:

 

  1. Find a good balance and exercise program

Look to build balance, strength, and flexibility.  Find a program you like through a local agency or through the internet, and enlist a friend.

 

  1. Talk to your health care provider

As for an assessment of your risk of falling.  Share your history of recent falls.

 

  1. Regularly review your medications with your doctor or pharmacist

Make sure that one of the side effects of your medication isn’t an increased risk of falling.  Take medications only as prescribed.

 

  1. Get your vision and hearing checked annually and update your eyeglasses

Your eyes and ears are key to keeping you on your feet.

 

  1. Keep your home safe

Remove tripping hazards, increase lighting, make stairs safe, and install grab bars in key areas.  It goes without saying that avoiding icy walkways, and wearing the right footwear is essential to preventing falls in the winter.

 

  1. Talk to family members

Enlist their support in taking simple steps and keeping your home safe. Falls are not just a Senior issue.

Flu Season in Full Swing

National Flu Awareness Week

Flu

  • The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death.
  • People of every age, including people in good health, are at risk of flu.
  • Influenza can cause illness & sometimes severe disease in persons of any age.
  • Flu causes millions of illnesses, hundreds of thousands of t1ospita1lzatlons and thousands or tens of thousands of deaths each year in the United States.
  • Although a majority of hospitalizations and deaths occur in people 65 years and older, even healthy young children and younger adults can have severe disease or even die from influenza.
  • Over 100 pediatric deaths from influenza were reported to CDC last season.

 

Flu Vaccinations

  • An annual flu vaccine is the best way to protect against this potentially
    serious disease.

– Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctor visits, missed work and
school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations.

– Flu vaccination also may make your illness milder if you do get sick.

– Getting vaccinated yourself protects people around you, including those    who are more vulnerable to serious flu illness, like babies and young
children, older people, and people with certain chronic health conditions.

  • Despite the unpredictable nature of the flu, you should know:

– You need the 2017-2018 flu vaccine for optimal protection against the
flu this season because:

o Flu viruses are constantly changing, and this season’s vaccines
have been updated to protect against the viruses that
surveillance data indicate will be most common this flu season

o  A person’s immune protection from vaccine declines over time so
annual flu vaccination is needed for the best protection

  • It takes about 2 weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body that protects against influenza virus infection.
  • While seasonal flu outbreaks can happen as early as October, flu activity is usually highest between December and February, though activity can last as late as May. As long as flu viruses are circulating, it’s not too late to get vaccinated, even in January or later.
  • With flu activity increasing & family & friends planning gatherings for the holidays, now is the time to get a flu vaccine if you haven’t been vaccinated yet this season. A flu vaccine can protect you & your loved ones from the flu.

 

#GivingTuesday M-R-I for Y-O-U

Many may think an MRI machine is just a piece of equipment, but it’s so much more. It can be a LIFESAVER. An MRI scan can help diagnose cancer, strokes, aneurysms, spinal issues and other injuries.

“A patient came in for an MRI on her shoulder due to severe pain,” recalls an MRI technician. “I noticed an abnormal area in her lung and brought this to the radiologist’s attention. The patient was diagnosed with lung cancer. I was told by the radiologist I saved her life because we caught the cancer early.”

At Bear Lake Memorial Hospital we have access to a mobile MRI machine, however, it is a shared resource between several hospitals and is only here 1 to 2 times per week. There are often waiting lists to receive an MRI with our current setup, which forces urgent out of the area trips to get an MRI scan. This limited access makes it difficult for our community to receive the best care.

Purchasing an MRI is an investment in us.  It is an investment in our community. It is an investment that we cannot delay.  This is an M-R-I for Y-O-U.

Your generous contribution to purchase an MRI machine can be made as a one-time investment or it can be structured as a periodic, recurring donation that you can modify at any time. Because Bear Lake Valley Health Care Foundation is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, your gifts are tax deductible.

Please use the enclosed donation card and return envelope to send in your gift or go online to http://www.blmhospital.com/foundation/ and click “Donate Now”

Brake for Breakfast Success

Bear Lake Memorial Hospital kicked off Breast Cancer Awareness Month with their annual Brake for Breakfast event on Wednesday, October 4th. Car after car proceeded through the nursing home driveway to receive their goodies. Brake for Breakfast is a regional event co-sponsored with The Hospital Cooperative in Pocatello.  With the help of hospital auxiliary volunteers, 1200 bags were given out containing information about mammograms and breast cancer along with a light breakfast. Some informational items were generously donated by the Susan G. Komen Affiliate of Idaho/Montana.

Another success to celebrate includes Bear Lake Valley Health Care Foundation and the Hospital Auxiliary purchasing a new bus for the Nursing Home and Assisted Living residents. An open house for the public will be held October 19th from 5– 6:30 pm to view the new bus and see the recently built employee/patient patio on the south end of the hospital. Donors will be recognized that evening.

Bear Lake Memorial wants to remind the people of Bear Lake Valley that prevention is the best protection and to get your mammogram. An appointment can be made by calling 208-847-1630.

BLMH named Top 100 Rural Hospitals in America

Bear Lake Memorial Hospital in Montpelier, ID was recently named one of the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals in the United States by iVantage Health Analytics and The Chartis Center for Rural Health. BLMH is one of only three hospitals in Idaho that have received this ranking.

Bear Lake Memorial scored in the top 100 of Critical Access Hospitals on iVantage Health Analytics’ Hospital Strength INDEX®. The INDEX is the industry’s most comprehensive rating of rural providers. Each hospital is measured across eight pillars of strength: Inpatient Share Ranking, Outpatient Share Ranking, Cost, Charge, Quality, Outcomes, Patient Perspectives, and Financial Stability.

“It’s more important than ever that rural hospitals proactively understand and address performance in the areas of cost, quality, outcomes and patient perspective. iVantage’s INDEX was designed to serve as this industry model,” said Michael Topchik, national leader of the Chartis Center for Rural Health.

Bear Lake Memorial Hospital and its Skilled Nursing Facility have also been recognized as Five Star Facilities by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Recognitions like these reinforce the high standard of quality healthcare the hospital provides and will continue to provide to the citizens of the Bear Lake Valley. Hospital Administrator, Dennis Carlson boasts, “This achievement is very gratifying and validates our daily commitment to providing the best health care possible to our community while maintaining an efficient and effective facility.”

 

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